YouTube will insert ads in videos from June without the consent of those who posted the video

All revenue from advertising inserts in videos on channels that are not popular enough or do not seek to make a profit from their content will go to the budget of the video hosting company, Entrepreneur magazine reported.

From June 1, the American video hosting company YouTube will be able to insert commercials into any video on its platform, even on channels that are not part of the company’s partner program, without the consent of the copyright holders. This was reported by Entrepreneur magazine with reference to a letter about changing the rules of the user agreement sent to users of the platform.

“YouTube has the right to monetize any content on the platform, and ads can appear on channels that are not part of the affiliate program,” one of the points of the new rules says. At the same time, all revenue from advertising inserts in videos on channels that are not popular enough or do not seek to make a profit from their content will go to the YouTube budget.

The change may make it more difficult for aspiring video bloggers to join the YouTube affiliate program and, consequently, generate revenue from advertising in their videos, as it will become more difficult for them to gain the necessary 1 thousand subscribers and 4 thousand hours of views on their channels.

In addition, the new rules will also affect content consumers, who, to get rid of a large number of video-interrupting ads, will be forced to agree to a paid subscription to YouTube Premium, which completely disables advertising in any videos on the platform.

For American users of the platform, the change has been in effect since November last year. This is not the first step of the American corporation Google, which owns YouTube, to increase the profitability of its video hosting. In March, the company announced that it could require video bloggers from around the world who create videos on its YouTube platform to pay income tax earned from viewing their content by US residents. As explained in the company, such a measure is necessary to meet the requirements of the US Internal Revenue Service, according to which the corporation must “collect tax information on all creators monetizing their content outside the United States” and “in certain cases, withhold taxes if these creators receive income from US residents.”

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Author: Steve Cowan
Graduated From Princeton University. He has been at the Free Press since October 2014. Previously worked as a regional entertainment editor.
Function: Chief-Editor

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