The US Department of Justice refused to secretly obtain media data in the investigation of leaks

The press secretary of the head of the US administration, Jen Psaki, previously reported that the White House did not know about the existence of a ban on the part of the Ministry of Justice to disclose information about the trial, which concerned the transfer of such data.

The US Department of Justice will no longer try to secretly obtain recordings of journalists through the court as part of an investigation into leaks of classified information. This was reported on Saturday by the Associated Press.

According to the representative of the department, Anthony Coley, it was decided to abandon the idea of seeking a mandatory trial to obtain information from media representatives. “The Ministry values the freedom of the press and is committed to taking the necessary steps to ensure the independence of journalists,” he said.

The New York Times on Wednesday received a notice from the Justice Department that the information of its journalists was transferred to the former Washington administration of Donald Trump. We are talking about telephone conversations and e-mail correspondence of the newspaper’s employees for the period from January 14 to April 30, 2017. The Trump administration requested this information last year. At the same time, on Friday, the newspaper reported on the ban on disclosing information about the trial, which concerned the transfer of such data. As stated on Saturday, the press secretary of the head of the US administration, Jen Psaki, the White House did not know about the existence of such a ban by the Ministry of Justice. “While the White House does not interfere in investigations, issuing subpoenas to request journalists’ records as part of leak investigations is not consistent with the president’s policy that he has outlined for the department. The Ministry of Justice has confirmed that such measures will not be applied in the future,” Psaki said in a statement.

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Author: Steve Cowan
Graduated From Princeton University. He has been at the Free Press since October 2014. Previously worked as a regional entertainment editor.
Function: Chief-Editor

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