The United States launched an intercontinental missile that can return to base

The United States has tested an unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile and tested a reentry vehicle. Writes about this DefenseNews with reference to the US Air Force.

The tests took place at the Vandenberg base in California. The Air Force said the test, in which the reentry vehicle flew approximately 6,800 kilometers to Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands, demonstrates that the United States’ nuclear deterrent is capable of dealing with threats and also “appeasing” allies.

“Our ICBM fleet is on alert 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,” Lt. Gen. Anthony Cotton, deputy commander of the Air Force Global Strike Command, said in an Air Force press release. “Field testing confirms our readiness and reliability of the Minuteman III. It also demonstrates to our citizens, our allies and our partners that men and women on the three missile wings provide reliable surveillance with a credible and effective strategic deterrent. ”

An unarmed Minuteman 3 intercontinental ballistic missile was launched early Wednesday from California at a target in the Pacific Ocean during a defense test, the Air Force said.

Those involved in the launch include the 90th Missile Wing based at FE Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming, the 91st Missile Wing based at Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota, and the 341st Missile Wing based at the Maelstrom Air Force Base. in Montana. In addition, the launch was supported by the pilots of the 576th Flight Test Squadron.

Preparation and planning of these launches occurs 6-12 months ahead of schedule, and the launch calendars are planned five years earlier. As a result, the Air Force declared that these launches did not correspond to world events or regional tensions.

Author: John Kessler
Graduated From the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously, worked in various little-known media. Currently is an expert, editor and developer of Free News.
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