The structure of human cells will help save damaged organs

Scientists have introduced technology to create material to preserve damaged organs. The collaboration of biologists from France, the USA and Colombia is described by Phys.org.

The new biomaterial consists of human fibroblasts – connective tissue cells that produce extracellular matrix components. Including they are precursors of collagen and elastin proteins.

The authors of the study combined fibroblasts into the thinnest sheets, and then cut them into separate threads. They can be twisted and even knotted to increase density. At the same time, this technology will allow stitching of wounds and ruptured vessels, as well as creating protective barriers around damaged organs.

The technology will also allow the growth of protective material from the cells of a certain person, this will lead to the fact that the body will not repel them.

Scientists have already tested the technology in rats that have open wounds sewn up and in a sheep in which an artificial blood vessel has appeared. In the near future, biomaterial will be tested in humans.