The solar system acquired its current form almost immediately after the formation

The solar system acquired its current form almost immediately after formation. This conclusion was reached by researchers from the School of Engineering of Sao Paulo State University, whose work was published in the journal Icarus.

The hypothesis that the solar system arose from a giant cloud of gas and dust was first put forward in the second half of the 18th century by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant and was further developed by the French mathematician Pierre-Simon de Laplace.

Now this is a consensus among astronomers, but there are differences between scientists in some details. Until recently, it was believed that the solar system acquired its current properties as a result of a period of turbulence that occurred approximately 700 million years after its formation. However, some of the latest studies show that it formed in the more distant past, at some stage during the first 100 million years.

Modeling by astronomers showed that the solar system was formed almost in its present form during the first 60 million years of the existence of the sun. First, from the clouds of gas and dust that surrounded the Sun about 4.6 billion years ago, giant planets formed – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, whose orbits were closer to each other and to the star than now.

“We first created a sculpture of the primary planetesimal disk. To do this, we had to return to the formation of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. Computer modeling based on the model we constructed in 2015 showed that the formation of Uranus and Neptune may have been the consequence of the formation of planetary nuclei with a mass of several terrestrial ones. The novelty of this study is that the model does not start with fully formed planets. Instead, Uranus and Neptune are still in a growth stage, and the driving force behind this process is two or three collisions involving objects of up to five Earth masses”.

Andre Isidoro Ferreira da Costa, lead author of the study