The President of the European Parliament said he was ready to agree to a new postponement of "Brexit" | FREE NEWS

The President of the European Parliament said he was ready to agree to a new postponement of “Brexit”

LONDON -The European Parliament (EP) is ready to agree to a new delay in the date of the UK’s exit from the European Union if there is a good reason and a request from London. The head of the EP David Sassoli stated in the statement, distributed on Tuesday in Brussels following his meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

“As for the postponement, the European Parliament is open to this possibility, if there is a good reason or purpose for it. But the request for a delay should be from the UK and it is not for me to comment on political disputes or legal issues that are being discussed in the United Kingdom,” he said.
According to Sassoli, at the moment there is no progress in the negotiations between Brussels and London. “I came here in the firm hope of hearing proposals that could move the talks forward. However, I must note that no progress has been made,” he said, stressing that the deal agreed on November 25, 2018, remains the “best possible” while Johnson’s plan does not address the main problems. “We will not accept a deal that undermines the Good Friday Agreement (the Belfast agreement of 1998, which ended years of conflict in Northern Ireland) and the peace process or jeopardizes the integrity of our single market. We made this clear in our resolution adopted by an overwhelming majority in September,” he said.

According to Sassoli, now there is no progress in the negotiations between Brussels and London. “I came here in the firm hope of hearing proposals that could move the talks forward. However, I must note that no progress has been made,” he said, stressing that the deal agreed on November 25, 2018, remains the “best possible” while Johnson’s plan does not address the main problems. “We will not accept a deal that undermines the Good Friday Agreement (the Belfast agreement of 1998, which ended years of conflict in Northern Ireland) and the peace process or jeopardizes the integrity of our single market. We made this clear in our resolution adopted by an overwhelming majority in September,” he said.