Study: climate change will dramatically reduce fish consumption in dozens of countries

Climate change will drastically reduce fish populations in countries that provide food through fish farming. Dozens of countries are under the threat of starvation.

The researchers said millions of people around the world could face hunger as climate change threatens fisheries. New projections that take into account the habitat and lifestyle of 800 fish species in more than 157 countries have shown how climate change is affecting them.

Analysis by an international team from the UK and Canada led by scientists from Lancaster University found climate change to be the most common threat to the supply of vital trace minerals from marine fish catches. They found that the supply of micronutrients from fisheries is vulnerable in the first place.

In addition to omega-3s, fish is an important source of iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin A. Lack of these essential micronutrients can lead to diseases such as stunted growth and preeclampsia.

Countries whose sources of micronutrients are at risk tend to be tropical and include countries in East Asia and the Pacific, such as Malaysia, Cambodia, Indonesia, and Timor-Leste, and sub-Saharan Africa, such as Mozambique and the Sierra. -Leone.

The vulnerability of the fisheries of these countries to climate change is especially great when you consider that the tropics are especially deficient in calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin A. In addition, these tropical countries are less resistant to the disruption of their fisheries due to climate change, because they are highly dependent from fishing to support the national economy and the diet of the population and have limited potential to adapt to such a situation.

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Author: John Kessler
Graduated From the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously, worked in various little-known media. Currently is an expert, editor and developer of Free News.
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John Kessler

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