Scientists have put forward a new hypothesis for the emergence of supermassive black holes

Scientists have suggested that the supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies were formed as a result of the collapse of supermassive stars in the early universe.

There are several hypotheses for creating supermassive black holes. According to the most obvious, the seeds of supermassive black holes formed after the death of the first massive stars in the early universe, and then they began to collect the surrounding gas until they finally turned into supermassive black holes.

However, not all representatives of the scientific community agree with this. Because the most massive stars observed in a local universe have a mass of about one or two hundred solar masses.

In order for them to form after death the supermassive black holes observed today, the accretion rates must be so high that it is difficult to imagine in real conditions.

According to one hypothesis, supermassive black holes form when large gas clouds collapse and turn into a relativistic star with a mass of several hundred thousand solar masses or more.

The authors of the new work built a model in which supermassive black holes emerged from supermassive supernovae.

According to the authors’ calculations, one of these supernovae can be observed using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which will be launched in late 2021.

If you have found a spelling error, please, notify us by selecting that text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

Alexandr Ivanov earned his Licentiate Engineer in Systems and Computer Engineering from the Free International University of Moldova. Since 2013, Alexandr has been working as a freelance web programmer.
Function: Web Developer and Editor
Alexandr Ivanov

Spelling error report

The following text will be sent to our editors: