Scientists have made nanosuperconductors with a DNA scaffold

American and Israeli scientists have come up with a nanomaterial with the property of superconductivity. Self-assembling DNA molecules served as a framework.

This engineered 3D nanomaterial can be used in various fields of science. For example, to amplify a signal in quantum computing sensors. Before that, it was possible to create only 1D and 2D structures, they looked like films or wires with superconductivity, they were obtained using the lithographic method.

Due to its structural programmability, DNA can provide an assembly platform for creating engineered nanostructures. However, the fragility of DNA makes it unsuitable for the manufacture of functional devices and nano-manufacturing from inorganic materials. In this study, we showed how DNA serves as a scaffold to create three-dimensional nanoscale architectures that can be completely transformed into inorganic materials such as superconductors.

Oleg Gang, Team Leader for Soft and Biological Nanomaterials at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials and Professor of Chemical Engineering, Applied Physics and Materials Science at Columbia University.

DNA structures are quite fragile, which leads to the fact that they need to be strengthened with additional materials. DNA is just a scaffold that serves to build various nanoarchitectural materials, they can completely transform into inorganic structures, for example, superconductors.

The authors hope that three-dimensional superconducting nanostructures can find applications in signal amplifiers that increase the speed and accuracy of quantum computers, and in supersensitive magnetic field sensors for medical imaging and subsurface mapping.

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