Scientists first linked melting ice in Antarctica with changing weather in the tropics

Scientists have for the first time associated the melting of ice in Antarctica with the changing weather in the tropics. According to the study, the loss of Arctic and Antarctic ice will be about one fifth of the warming that is predicted to occur in the tropics. This is stated in the work of scientists from the University of California, which is published in the journal Nature.

Over the past 40 years, the Earth has lost up to 75% of the total Arctic ice. At the same time, Arctic ice reflects sunlight into the atmosphere and space. Therefore, the less ice, the more the Earth’s atmosphere heats up. This leads, respectively, to a greater melting of ice.

At the same time, existing climate models took into account only sea level rise due to melting ice and could not build a causal relationship between climatic events that occur in different regions.

This problem was solved by a new model, in the construction of which the researchers took into account data on a record reduction in the thickness of sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctica and the influence of these events on the climate in the equator.

Modeling showed that the loss of sea ice in the Antarctic and the Arctic leads to the appearance of warm winds in the Pacific Ocean, which suppress the upward movement of cold water from the depths of the ocean. This will lead to surface warming, which will be especially noticeable in the eastern equatorial part of the Pacific Ocean, which will then turn into El Nino.

As the water on the surface of the ocean heats up, more rainfall will occur in coastal areas. In general, the researchers believe that the loss of ice at both poles will lead to a warming of the ocean surface at 0.5 ° C at the equator and will add more than 0.3 mm of precipitation per day in the same region.

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