Polish scuba divers found a sunken ship, where can the Amber room be located

Military vehicles, china, and crates with unknown contents were found in the holds.

Polish divers have found the wreckage of a German World War II ship, which may help solve a long-standing mystery-the location of the Amber room that disappeared without a trace from the Nazi-looted Tsar’s Palace in Russia.

The Amber Room, richly decorated with amber and gold, was part of the Catherine Palace near Saint Petersburg but was last seen in Konigsberg (now Kaliningrad).

In 1945, the steamer Karlsruhe sailed from Konigsberg with a heavy cargo, which was later sunk by Soviet military aircraft off the coast of Poland.

Divers from the Baltictech group say they have found the sunken Karlsruhe.

“We have been searching for the wreckage since last year when we realized that the bottom of the Baltic Sea might contain an interesting secret history,” said diver Tomas Stakhura. “It’s practically intact. In the holds, we found military vehicles, china, and many boxes with unknown contents.”

The Karlsruhe took part in operation Hannibal, one of the largest naval evacuations in history, which saw more than a million German soldiers and East Prussian civilians escape the Soviet offensive at the end of World War II.

Historical documents show that the steamer left Konigsberg in a hurry with a large cargo and 1,083 people on board.

“All this together spurs the imagination. The discovery at the bottom of the Baltic Sea of a German steamer and boxes with still unknown contents may have a great significance for this whole story,” said diver Tomasz Zvara.

The Amber Room was built in Prussia and then given to Peter the Great in 1716.
During the war, the Germans dismantled the room and took it to Konigsberg, and later it disappeared during the bombing.