On the eve of Memorial Day, many Americans are sent to travel for the first time since the quarantine

People are trying to “catch up” – last year, Memorial Day was celebrated at the height of the coronavirus pandemic.

Many Americans went o a trip during the “long weekend” associated with Monday’s Memorial Day holiday. In this way, people are eager to catch up on more than one year of pandemic-related restrictions and get their lives back on track.

Memorial Day, celebrated in memory of Americans who died in all wars and military conflicts, is considered the unofficial beginning of summer. With the start of the “long weekend,” on the eve of Memorial Day, people traditionally go to relax on the beaches and in the parks.

If last year many US residents were unable to travel due to restrictions related to the coronavirus, now Americans want to return to the usual celebration of Memorial Day.

US Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas urged Americans to be patient this weekend at airports.

“People are going to face queues because there are a huge number of people going to travel this weekend, “he said

More than 1.8 million people passed through U.S. airports on Thursday, and that number is expected to rise over the weekend.

Mayorkas also recalled that the federal order on the mandatory wearing of masks is still in effect at airports and on planes.

The federal government and many state authorities have relaxed the requirements for wearing masks in many places for people who are fully vaccinated against the coronavirus. Now that most Americans have protected themselves from the disease with a vaccine, many are eager to catch up, including by going on vacation.

The American Automobile Association (AAA) said it expects a 60 percent increase in travel this Memorial Day compared to last year: 37 million Americans plan to travel at least 50 miles from home, mostly by car. The boom in travel comes despite the rise in the price of gasoline.

The Reuters news agency reported that the price index for goods and services related to Memorial Day rose about 4.3% faster this year than the overall consumer price index. This year, prices for food such as hamburgers and hot dogs, restaurant dinners and drinks, entrance fees to amusement parks, concert tickets, and car rentals have risen. Prices for air tickets and hotel accommodation are still lower than before the pandemic. Prices for many goods have increased due to rising consumer demand, as well as problems with the supply of materials and a lack of labor.

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Author: Steve Cowan
Graduated From Princeton University. He has been at the Free Press since October 2014. Previously worked as a regional entertainment editor.
Function: Chief-Editor

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