NATO has announced a method for resolving disputes over the S-400

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said that all differences between the alliance members should be resolved at joint meetings.

According to him, the organization provides an excellent platform for such negotiations, whether it is the Eastern Mediterranean situation or the purchase of S-400 complexes by Turkey.

The Secretary-General of the alliance stressed that countries with different histories and geography will always have different views on the same issues. Stoltenberg noted that the role of NATO is to reduce tensions between its members.

“We have a de-escalation mechanism in relations between Turkey and Greece on activities in the Aegean Sea. We will do everything possible to resolve the problems within the framework of negotiations,”

the head of the alliance said.

Deliveries of the latest Russian S-400 air defense systems, which caused a misunderstanding in Turkey’s relations with the United States, began in mid-July 2019. Washington demanded to abandon the deal and offered to purchase American Patriot systems in return, threatening to delay or cancel the sale of F-35 fighter jets to Turkey, as well as impose sanctions. Ankara refused to make concessions and continued negotiations on an additional batch of S-400.

In mid-January 2021, the head of the Turkish Defense Ministry, Hulusi Akar, confirmed that the parties continue negotiations on the supply of the second regiment of S-400 air defense systems. Then the Turkish leader Recep Erdogan shared the details of the situation with the purchase of weapons.

The Turkish vessel Oruc Reis conducts seismic surveys in the Eastern Mediterranean in an area that Greece considers its exclusive economic zone (EEZ). The Greek armed forces were put on high alert. Turkey is also researching Cyprus.

Cyprus has been de facto divided between the Greek and Turkish communities since 1974. In 1983, the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” was proclaimed in the north of the island, not recognized by the international community. Only the Republic of Cyprus, which de facto controls the south of the island, remains internationally recognized. The Greek and Turkish communities of the island have been negotiating the political reunification of Cyprus for many years but have not yet succeeded.

Author: Steve Cowan
Graduated From Princeton University. He has been at the Free Press since October 2014. Previously worked as a regional entertainment editor.
Function: Chief-Editor
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