Langoustines turned out to be the noisiest animals on Earth – their scratching can be heard for 3 km!

Langoustines turned out to be the noisiest animals on Earth – their scratching can be heard for 3 km, and in volume they are comparable to the roar of a turbojet aircraft. This is stated in a study by scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Langoustines belong to the order of higher crayfish and lead a secretive lifestyle, avoiding close proximity with other langoustines, as well as with other inhabitants of the seas. As feed, they prefer smaller crustaceans, their larvae, mollusks, fish eggs, and their meat.

In a new study, scientists used a system of broadband hydrophones to study the sounds of various marine invertebrates. A study in shallow water off the west coast of Brittany showed that langoustines produce very loud sounds that were comparable in volume to the roar of a turbojet engine or a shot from a large-caliber revolver.

In shallow water, sound spread over a distance of 10 to 400 m – according to scientists, at the bottom of the ocean where langoustines live, sound can spread over a distance of 2 to 3 km.

The source of these acoustic vibrations, as shown by observations of individual spiny lobsters, was their antennae. Invertebrates rubbed them about the chitinous outgrowth, which is located between their eyes. Scientists do not yet know exactly why animals make these sounds – probably this way they warn relatives about the approach of a predator.