How European countries intend to defend against the delta strain

Countries across Europe are struggling to speed up vaccinations against the coronavirus and neutralize the spread of the more contagious delta variant to prevent hospital wards from filling up again with patients fighting for their lives. This urgency, the Associated Press notes, is due to the approaching peak of summer vacations and vacations in Europe, when good weather encourages people to turn up in large numbers in places of recreation, and governments do not want to stop public gatherings. At the same time, social distancing is neglected by many, especially young people, and some countries are even abolishing the requirement to wear masks outdoors.

According to the European Center for Disease Control (ECDC), which monitors the situation in 30 countries of the Old World, the risk of contracting the delta variant is “high to very high” for partially or unvaccinated communities. “It is very important to move the introduction of the vaccine at a very fast pace,” warned the ECDC. Experts estimate that by the end of August, the delta variant will account for 90 percent of infections in the European Union. At the same time, the peak of infections is likely to occur in September, when people begin to return to their offices from vacations in droves. The World Health Organization (WHO) is also concerned about the rapid spread of the delta variant in European countries. This option makes transmission growth “extremely rapid”, according to Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO’s technical director for COVID-19.

Countries across Europe are struggling to speed up vaccinations against the coronavirus and neutralize the spread of the more contagious delta variant to prevent hospital wards from filling up again with patients fighting for their lives. This urgency, the Associated Press notes, is due to the approaching peak of summer vacations and vacations in Europe, when good weather encourages people to turn up in large numbers in places of recreation, and governments do not want to stop public gatherings. At the same time, social distancing is neglected by many, especially young people, and some countries are even abolishing the requirement to wear masks outdoors.

According to the European Center for Disease Control (ECDC), which monitors the situation in 30 countries of the Old World, the risk of contracting the delta variant is “high to very high” for partially or unvaccinated communities. “It is very important to move the introduction of the vaccine at a very fast pace,” warned the ECDC. Experts estimate that by the end of August, the delta variant will account for 90 percent of infections in the European Union. At the same time, the peak of infections is likely to occur in September, when people begin to return to their offices from vacations in droves. The World Health Organization (WHO) is also concerned about the rapid spread of the delta variant in European countries. This option makes transmission growth “extremely rapid”, according to Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO’s technical director for COVID-19.

The daily number of new cases of the disease is already on the rise in some countries. In Britain, delta cases quadrupled in less than a month, with confirmed cases on Friday up 46 percent from the previous week. Portuguese health authorities this week reported a “dizzying” increase in the spread of the delta variant, which accounted for only 4 percent of cases in May and already almost 56 percent in June. The country has recorded the largest number of daily infections since February, and the number of patients with COVID-19 in hospitals for the first time since early April exceeded 500.

In some European countries, the virus is spreading much faster among young people. In Spain, the national rate of 14 days notification of cases per 100,000 people rose to 152 on Friday. But in the age group of 20-29 years, this figure increased to 449. These numbers have caused alarm throughout the continent, but European countries are not only in no hurry to introduce new lockdowns, but are also lifting restrictive measures. In England, last week, at Wembley Stadium in London, about 40 thousand fans gathered for the European Football Championship match against Germany. In Portugal, new curfew restrictions for 45 municipalities, including Lisbon, are met with little enthusiasm by the population, especially restricting restaurant opening times on weekends. France lifted the last of its quarantine measures on Wednesday, allowing unlimited numbers of people in restaurants, weddings and most cultural events, despite a rapidly growing number of delta cases in the Fifth Republic.

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Author: Steve Cowan
Graduated From Princeton University. He has been at the Free Press since October 2014. Previously worked as a regional entertainment editor.
Function: Chief-Editor
Steve Cowan

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