Congress predicts US nuclear spending to reach $634 billion by 2030

Two-thirds of the funds will go to the Pentagon, with the largest costs associated with submarine-launched ballistic missiles and intercontinental ballistic missiles.

The maintenance of nuclear forces, including modernization programs, will cost the United States $634 billion by 2030. This forecast is contained in a report published on Monday by the Congressional Budget Office.

“If approved, the budget requests of the Pentagon and the Department of Energy for the 2021 fiscal year [began October 1, 2020], the maintenance of nuclear forces in the period from 2021 to 2030 will cost a total of $634 billion,” the text says. – Two-thirds of this volume will go to the Pentagon, the largest costs are associated with submarine-launched ballistic missiles and intercontinental ballistic missiles. Among the articles of the Ministry of Energy are nuclear weapons laboratories and related activities.”

The Congressional Budget Office’s 2019 report, which covered the period through 2028, estimated total spending at $494 billion. The increase in projected funding is related, in particular, to nuclear modernization programs. On Monday, Democratic Senators Edward Markey and Earl Blumenauer reintroduced the “Smarter Approach to Nuclear Spending” bill, which provides for a $73 billion reduction in related funding. In particular, it is proposed to reduce the number of intercontinental ballistic missiles from more than 400 to 150, and the number of deployed warheads from 1,500 to 1,000 units.

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Author: Steve Cowan
Graduated From Princeton University. He has been at the Free Press since October 2014. Previously worked as a regional entertainment editor.
Function: Chief-Editor

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