Chinese scientists forced male rats to give birth

The experiment reminded their Western counterpart of Frankenstein.

Scientists at the Naval Medical University in Shanghai have published data from an experiment in which a male rat carried and gave birth to baby rats. The study is published on the preprints website bioRxiv.org. The Chinese said that their experiment could become a model of male pregnancy in mammals. But their colleagues from Western countries called the experience “disgusting.”

The male and female rats were combined, so to speak, into one being, binding them together and uniting their circulatory systems. The male was transplanted with a uterus from a third rat, and then he and his “half” were implanted with embryos. Scientists hoped that the blood of a pregnant female would help the male bear offspring.

This experiment was not the only one – the researchers from Shanghai used 46 rat pairs. The males were planted with 280 embryos. As a result, they gave birth to 10 baby rats, which then developed normally. The delivery was performed by cesarean section.

“As far as we know, pregnancy in male mammals has never been reported before,” the experimenters proudly reported.

Their delight was not shared by the senior adviser of PETA (the organization “People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals”) Emily McIvor. She called the study “disgusting” and similar to the experiments of Frankenstein: “These shocking experiments are dictated solely by curiosity and do not contribute in any way to our understanding of the human reproductive system.” By the way, male pregnancy exists in nature – but not in mammals, but in seahorses, blowfish, and sea dragons that carry offspring in the parent bag.

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Author: Ivan Maltsev
The study of political and social problems of different countries of the world. Analysis of large companies on the world market. Observing world leaders in the political arena.
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Ivan Maltsev

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