Buckingham Palace showed wedding photos of Princess Beatrice

Buckingham Palace has released official photos from the wedding of Queen Elizabeth II’s granddaughter Princess Beatrice and millionaire Edoardo Mapelli-Mozzi.

The two official photos came a day after a low-key ceremony at the royal chapel of All Saints in Windsor, to which only the closest relatives were invited.

In one of the photos, the newlyweds leave the chapel through a flower-covered arch. On the other, they are standing at the entrance to the chapel with Beatrice’s grandparents-Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip.

Beatrice’s estranged parents, Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson are not present in these two photos, although Palace officials confirmed that the bride was led down the aisle by her father.
Prince Andrew continues to keep a low profile after the arrest of his former girlfriend, Ghislaine Maxwell, who is accused of aiding Jeffrey Epstein, pimping, and child molestation. Maxwell denies all charges.

Photos from Beatrice’s wedding appeared on the front pages of most Sunday British Newspapers.

The absence of Prince Andrew in the photos was the main news for many of them. “Where is dad?” reads the Sunday Mirror tabloid headline and Sunday People in its headline notes: “At least they let my grandmother in.”

The Queen lent Beatrice a vintage frosted ivory satin dress, as did the diamond-edged tiara that Elizabeth II wore to her wedding in 1947.

The wedding was initially scheduled for May but was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

When the UK declared quarantine on March 23, marriage ceremonies were banned. They resumed after July 4-with a limited number of guests (no more than 30).

In a statement, Buckingham Palace said that the ceremony was held in compliance with all government recommendations.

For the Queen and her husband, this is the first family event since the start of the quarantine.

Beatrice and Edoardo started Dating in September 2018 and got engaged last September.

After the ceremony, Beatrice’s wedding bouquet was handed to the head of Westminster Abbey, the Reverend Anthony Ball. She laid it on the grave of the Unknown Soldier — following tradition for brides from the Royal family.