Astronomers have explained the rapid formation of supermassive black holes

Astronomers have explained the rapid formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe. The reason for this process was the fusion of several black holes in the centers of galaxies and the active accretion of gas, according to a study by scientists from the University of Trieste, published in The Astrophysical Journal.

According to classical theories, a supermassive black hole arises in the center of a galaxy during the capture of surrounding matter – mainly gas. Such objects absorb matter in a rhythm proportional to their mass. For this reason, in the initial stages of development, when the mass of the black hole is small, growth should be very slow.

Nevertheless, observations show that already 800 million years after the Big Bang in the early Universe there were supermassive black holes that, according to classical theories, would not have time to form.

In their work, scientists created a model for the formation of supermassive black holes and found that the merger of several ordinary black holes into one supermassive allows the latter to reach a mass of 10 thousand to 1 million times greater than the mass of the Sun in just 50-100 million years.

Researchers note that observations using the LISA and LIGO/Virgo observatories will help verify this theory.

“The confluence of numerous black holes in the centers of galaxies will produce gravitational waves, which we expect to see and study using existing and future detectors”

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